Introducing Sally: Massage Therapist, Yoga Teacher and trainee Physiotherapist

Hello my name is Sally and I have just started working at the You Massage & Therapy Centre, Southampton. I would like to take the opportunity to introduce myself and my journey as well as giving you an insight into what I can offer here.

I have worked in the healthcare industry since 2005 and have always had a passion for maintenance of health from a holistic perspective. I qualified as an Occupational Therapist (BSc Hons) in 2010 and have since worked with a huge variety of patients in the NHS and private rehabilitation settings, predominantly with clients with neurological conditions.

Away from healthcare my passion for fitness and holistic health led me to gain qualifications as a level 2 exercise instructor (2010) and to complete two Yoga teaching qualifications; one in India in 2011 (Yoga Alliance accredited), followed by a further 200-hour British Wheel of Yoga accredited teacher training completed in 2014…. Continue reading

OVERVIEW OF THE KNEE – by Southampton Physiotherapist – Phil Coleman

The Knee

Written for YOU Massage & Therapy Centre Southampton by Physiotherapist Phil Coleman

southampton knee physioThe knee joint is a modified hinge joint, meaning that it flexes (bends) and extends (straightens) but also has a small degree of rotation.  Its stability is largely provided by ligaments such as the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL) and the medial and lateral ligaments. The knee’s movements are provided mainly by the quadriceps at the front of the thigh (knee extensors) and the hamstrings and calf complex behind (knee flexors).  The knees also have soft cartilage pads (the menisci) shaped like moon crescents on the medial and lateral aspect.  These act as shock absorbs and give knees greater stability.

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Physiotherapy in Southampton

Physiotherapy is a well-established healthcare profession concerned with human function and movement and maximising potential.

Physiotherapists train through the NHS and graduate with a BSc (Hons) degree after 3 years of study which includes at least 1000 hours of supervised clinical experience.  The study also includes a piece of research as a dissertation.

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Ideas to reduce the risk of injury whilst running

This list has been compiled by Southampton Physiotherapist and running expert, Phil at YOU Massage Southampton

Running on hard services increases the risk of injury. Research does not show a strong link, but it’s probably best to run on a variety of surfaces as this varies the loading pattern.

Here are some more Ideas to reduce the risk of injury

  • Have a training strategy!
  • Increase volume no more than 10% a week
  • Never increase intensity and volume simultaneously
  • Your longest run should be less than half your total weekly mileage
  • Sleep well – this is when the body recovers.
  • Good nutrition. It is now thought that distance runners need higher levels of protein to ensure recovery. Also, vitamin C has an affinity to collagen and so may aid tendon repair.  Runners are commonly found to be low in iron and vitamin D, essential for tissue repair and performance.
  • Strength training. There’s growing evidence (more than stretching!) that exercises such as squats, lunges and calf raises can protect against injury.
  • The ideal cadence, or step rate, is thought to be 170 – 190 per minute. If your cadence is less than 170 you could be over striding, increasing the stress on the body.  Simply by shortening your stride slightly can help.  Over striders tend to be noisy on their feet and heel strikers.  Some GPS watches show cadence.
  • Know when not to run. Try the hop test – you should be able to hop quickly on each leg x 20 times with no pain to run.  Increasing pain when running, increased pain the next day, pain above 5/10 and running with a limp are indicators that you should not run and be checked.

Performance Indicators

Below is mainly from Frank Horwill, the late and great running coach.

  • Marathon potential is 5 x 10K time minus 10 minutes
  • All distances are connected – to run a good marathon you need to run a good 10K, to run a good 10K you need to run a good 5K, need to run a good mile, need to run a good 400m. Therefore training should reflect this with multi-paced runs. https://www.runnersworld.co.uk/rws-training-pace-calculator  is a link which explains the different paces and can auto calculate your paces.
  • Frank Horwill described the 4 second rule – for example, if your best 400m time is 60 seconds, your best possible 800m is 2:08 (64+64). For 1500, add another 4 seconds per lap, and so on. So everything is based on your best 400m time.
  • Optimum training mileage for a marathon is thought to be 70 miles a week. Although Mo Farah does 120 a week but then he’s a full time athlete

Book in to see a Runners Physio for your optimum health report and guidance for injury prevention, Book online today, follow this link >

Reducing Running Injuries

RUNNING INJURIES AND PERFORMANCE

By Southampton Physiotherapist, Phil Coleman

Click to book online for your Free Consultation *

I have been a club runner for 35 years, competing on road, cross country and track.   I am a physiotherapist with a specialist interest in running and I have no injuries and my knees are perfect (thought I would get that one out of the way!)  I have contributed to magazine articles such as Why Cheetahs Don’t Stretch in Frontline and Power up Your Hamstrings in Athletics Weekly.

Running injuries are very common, but rarely serious, with up to 80% getting injured every year.  Running can be stressful on the body with impact forces of 2.5 times body weight with every step. This increases further with fast and downhill running.  The body takes time to adapt to this stress. New comers to running are more prone to injury than experienced runners. Continue reading

What Therapy should I book?

Plenty of people feel confused about where to turn to when they have pain. With so many choices available it’s important to know who’s who and what they can do.  Health and safety Executive (2016/17) states that 507,000 workers suffered from work-related musculoskeletal disorders and 45% of the disorders were from upper limbs or neck. Millions of work days are lost per year due to injuries.

Each therapist is unique, and the education varies between different practitioners. But most importantly their main goal is to ensure you are living your life to the fullest pain free. Different types of treatments suit different people and depending on your condition it’s important to find the most suited professional for your needs.

Chiropractic

Chiropractic care – you either love or hate it. In history they’ve been known as bone crackers and this can create some unease for people who haven’t tried it before.

Although they are defined as Neuromuscular specialists the scope of practice is classified as an ‘alternative medicine’. To become a chiropractor in the UK, 5 years of training is required before practising. There is emphasis on treatment and prevention of mechanical disorders, manual therapy and adjustments are used. There is a large focus on the function of the spine and the neuromuscular system of the body.

Types of treatment:

Rehab, massage, X-rays, ultrasound, and different manual techniques.

Common conditions that are treated:

Sciatica, migraines, herniated disk, chronic pain, neck and back pain.

Osteopathy

Osteopathy was introduced in America before Chiropractic, there have been stories that the inventor of Chiropractic stole his theory. Now there is still some questions about the differences.

Osteopathy is also classed as an ‘alternative medicine’ and 4 years of education is needed before practising. Osteopathy treatment aims at preventing mechanical disorders by moving, stretching, and massaging a patient’s muscles and joints. A person’s wellbeing depends on the health of the individual’s bones, muscles, ligaments and connective tissue functioning smoothly together.

Types of treatment:

Dry needling, soft tissue and articulation techniques.

Common conditions that are treated:

Arthritis, digestive problems, tennis elbow, neck and back pain.

Osteopathy is offered at our studio in Bedford Place, Southampton.

Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy aims at treating disease, injury, or deformity by using massage, exercise, and heat treatment without using drugs or surgery. There is a large emphasis on movement and increasing mobility in the joints to prevent further injury.

It’s most commonly practised within the NHS but also in private care. Minimal training required is 3 years, but some may extend their education further within a specific field. It’s a science-based therapy which treats neurological, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, and respiratory conditions.

Types of treatment: Movement and exercise, manual therapy, education and advice.

Common conditions that are treated: Sport injuries, stroke, Parkinson’s, chronic heart disease, and asthma.

We welcome Philip to the team of YOU Massage Therapy offering Physiotherapy, appointments available for Physiotherapy in Southampton NOW. Book online or call 02380 639747

Massage therapy

Massage therapy aims at enhancing a person’s wellbeing with manual manipulation of soft tissues of the body, including muscles, tendons, ligaments, and connective tissue. There are several different types of massage treatments available, but the two main groups are:

Rehabilitative massage: Sports massage, Deep tissue, medical, therapeutic or clinical massage.

Relaxation massage: Swedish massage, holistic massage, and reflexology.

The main purpose of massage is to relieve stress and tension from the body and mind. There are a lot of choices of massage, it’s important to find the type that suites you. Trigger points and soft tissue techniques are used to relieve pain and stress within the muscles.

Types of treatment:

Lymphatic drainage, Reiki, Myo-fascial, aromatherapy, and Thai massage.

Common conditions treated:

Headaches, frozen shoulder, strains and sprains, muscular pain, and tendinitis.

Southampton’s newest Physiotherapist – Phil

Southampton Physiotherapy

YOU Massage are exceptionally excited to be now offering expert Physiotherapy to the

Running-Physio-Southampton

Philip is a life-long running enthusiast, with a specialist interest in Physio for athletes

people of Southampton from our Bedford

Meet Philip, and receive a complementary Southampton Physio consultation * this September 2018.

Book online or call 02380 639747

As written by Philip Coleman BSc (Hons) MCSP for YOU Massage Therapy

Chartered Physiotherapist

Philip is a chartered and HCPC registered physiotherapist.

After gaining a BSc (Hons) degree in physiotherapy in 2008 from UWE, Bristol he worked as a rotational physiotherapist in the NHS, covering musculoskeletal outpatients, orthopaedics and elderly rehabilitation.

Since graduation he has been on various post graduate training and courses.

On promotion to senior physiotherapist he worked at the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford as a clinical specialist in the musculoskeletal triage service, where he assessed patients to identify their optimal clinical pathway. He also helped run classes for patients with chronic back pain.  More recently he has specialised in musculoskeletal conditions in private practice and has also had experience in community physiotherapy in the NHS where he helped patients with complex medical conditions.  Philip is qualified in the Otago exercise programme for the prevention of falls, a major cause of disability in an ageing population….

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