OSTEOARTHRITIS – how Physiotherapy can help

Physiotherapy Southampton for OsteoarthritisAs written by Southampton Physiotherapist, Phil Coleman

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a very common condition involving the degeneration of joints in the body, commonly affecting the knees, hips, lower back and neck, base of the thumb and big toe and finger joints. The degeneration particularly affects the cartilage, the smooth, slippery surface between the joints. The body cannot replace cartilage but attempts to repair the damage but makes it worse, laying down new bone in the form of osteophytes (bony spurs).

Types of Osteoarthritis

There’re two main types of OA – primary, where there’s no clear cause of the breakdown of cartilage, although there may be a genetic link, and secondary, where OA may develop in later life following injury such as a fracture or ligament damage.  For example, ankle fractures commonly become arthritic and footballers with a history of major knee ligament damage may develop knee OA.  More recently, a high BMI has been linked to OA in weight bearing joints.

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Introducing Chiropractic Student and sports Massage therapist: Islay

chiropractor southampton

Islay has had extensive training and is commencing a Masters degree in Chiropractic this year

Qualifications and experience

Islay is a qualified Sports Massage Therapist Level 3

She is also studying to become a Chiropractor at the AECC and will be entering her final year in September 2019.

As a competitive sports person Islay understands the importance of keeping the body free from pain and is partially skilled in identifying and reducing painful muscle knots.

Islay believes in the importance of the mind-body connection and alters her massage treatments to ensure her patients leave the room feeling relaxed and rejuvenated.

 

Skills:

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Western Acupuncture – Dry Needling – with Osteopath Edward

Southampton AcupunctureSouthampton Osteopath, Ed Webb, offers Dry Needling from our Bedford Place studio

What is dry needling?

The popular treatment of dry needling (as opposed to wet needling such as Botox, corticosteroids, anaesthetics etc), also known as western or medical acupuncture, is frequently used by health care professionals such as osteopaths, physiotherapists, chiropractors and even some GPs.

By effectively isolating problem areas on the body, namely myofascial trigger points, the therapist can deliver fine acupuncture needles intramuscularly. Several studies have shown immediate improvements in pain and/or disability by targeting trigger points in this way, and there is no shortage of clients and patients who can advocate the outstanding effects of this ever-popular treatments.

How does Dry needling it work?

The proposed mechanism of dry needling involves the mechanical disruption of the integrity of dysfunctional endplates, alterations in the length and tension of muscle fibres and stimulation of mechanoreceptors, increased muscle blood flow and oxygenation, and endogenous opioid release affecting peripheral and central sensitization, among others.

What on earth does that all mean I hear you say?

Essentially, dry needling therapy induces a stimulatory effect on the body’s tissues, which helps kickstart the body’s own painkilling and healing capabilities; amazing right? Osteopaths amongst many other practitioners and therapists have known for a long time about the internal powers our bodies possess to heal themselves, our job is merely to bring about and facilitate this change and reach equilibrium.

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Exercise Ideas – by Southampton Physiotherapist – Phil

Body Weight Exercises

Simple exercises using body weight and requiring minimal or no equipment are often the best as they use the body’s natural bio-mechanics and levers and are often functional. That is, they combine strength, endurance, mobility and balance.  This gives all round conditioning which may help performance and reduce the risk of injury in sports but also allows the participant to become generally fitter. Continue reading

Meet Ed – Osteopath and Sports Massage Therapist

We would like to welcome Ed to the team of YOU Massage and Therapy Centre.

Whether you’re an office worker or a sports person, Ed’s treatment can help you! Working across London and the South, he has gained valuable experience in treating treating a wide variety of patients, such as the homeless, chronically ill, pregnant women, the elderly and children. Furthermore he is also a fully qualified personal trainer, dry needling therapist and sports massage therapist to complement and enhance his treatment approach.
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Lower Back Pain

Lower back pain can be caused by any number of things. In this article I will be focusing on what I see most commonly with my clients, which is postural/environmental resulting in muscle imbalances.

 

Let me start by explaining what I mean by postural/environmental and what a muscle imbalance is.

In general, as a society we spend a lot of our day sitting. Whether this is at a desk or in a car, train or plane. In fact in western civilisation we sit on average 23 hours a day. Continue reading

Ideas to reduce the risk of injury whilst running

This list has been compiled by Southampton Physiotherapist and running expert, Phil at YOU Massage Southampton

Running on hard services increases the risk of injury. Research does not show a strong link, but it’s probably best to run on a variety of surfaces as this varies the loading pattern.

Here are some more Ideas to reduce the risk of injury

  • Have a training strategy!
  • Increase volume no more than 10% a week
  • Never increase intensity and volume simultaneously
  • Your longest run should be less than half your total weekly mileage
  • Sleep well – this is when the body recovers.
  • Good nutrition. It is now thought that distance runners need higher levels of protein to ensure recovery. Also, vitamin C has an affinity to collagen and so may aid tendon repair.  Runners are commonly found to be low in iron and vitamin D, essential for tissue repair and performance.
  • Strength training. There’s growing evidence (more than stretching!) that exercises such as squats, lunges and calf raises can protect against injury.
  • The ideal cadence, or step rate, is thought to be 170 – 190 per minute. If your cadence is less than 170 you could be over striding, increasing the stress on the body.  Simply by shortening your stride slightly can help.  Over striders tend to be noisy on their feet and heel strikers.  Some GPS watches show cadence.
  • Know when not to run. Try the hop test – you should be able to hop quickly on each leg x 20 times with no pain to run.  Increasing pain when running, increased pain the next day, pain above 5/10 and running with a limp are indicators that you should not run and be checked.

Performance Indicators

Below is mainly from Frank Horwill, the late and great running coach.

  • Marathon potential is 5 x 10K time minus 10 minutes
  • All distances are connected – to run a good marathon you need to run a good 10K, to run a good 10K you need to run a good 5K, need to run a good mile, need to run a good 400m. Therefore training should reflect this with multi-paced runs. https://www.runnersworld.co.uk/rws-training-pace-calculator  is a link which explains the different paces and can auto calculate your paces.
  • Frank Horwill described the 4 second rule – for example, if your best 400m time is 60 seconds, your best possible 800m is 2:08 (64+64). For 1500, add another 4 seconds per lap, and so on. So everything is based on your best 400m time.
  • Optimum training mileage for a marathon is thought to be 70 miles a week. Although Mo Farah does 120 a week but then he’s a full time athlete

Book in to see a Runners Physio for your optimum health report and guidance for injury prevention, Book online today, follow this link >

Reducing Running Injuries

RUNNING INJURIES AND PERFORMANCE

By Southampton Physiotherapist, Phil Coleman

Click to book online for your Free Consultation *

I have been a club runner for 35 years, competing on road, cross country and track.   I am a physiotherapist with a specialist interest in running and I have no injuries and my knees are perfect (thought I would get that one out of the way!)  I have contributed to magazine articles such as Why Cheetahs Don’t Stretch in Frontline and Power up Your Hamstrings in Athletics Weekly.

Running injuries are very common, but rarely serious, with up to 80% getting injured every year.  Running can be stressful on the body with impact forces of 2.5 times body weight with every step. This increases further with fast and downhill running.  The body takes time to adapt to this stress. New comers to running are more prone to injury than experienced runners. Continue reading

What Therapy should I book?

Plenty of people feel confused about where to turn to when they have pain. With so many choices available it’s important to know who’s who and what they can do.  Health and safety Executive (2016/17) states that 507,000 workers suffered from work-related musculoskeletal disorders and 45% of the disorders were from upper limbs or neck. Millions of work days are lost per year due to injuries.

Each therapist is unique, and the education varies between different practitioners. But most importantly their main goal is to ensure you are living your life to the fullest pain free. Different types of treatments suit different people and depending on your condition it’s important to find the most suited professional for your needs.

Chiropractic

Chiropractic care – you either love or hate it. In history they’ve been known as bone crackers and this can create some unease for people who haven’t tried it before.

Although they are defined as Neuromuscular specialists the scope of practice is classified as an ‘alternative medicine’. To become a chiropractor in the UK, 5 years of training is required before practising. There is emphasis on treatment and prevention of mechanical disorders, manual therapy and adjustments are used. There is a large focus on the function of the spine and the neuromuscular system of the body.

Types of treatment:

Rehab, massage, X-rays, ultrasound, and different manual techniques.

Common conditions that are treated:

Sciatica, migraines, herniated disk, chronic pain, neck and back pain.

Osteopathy

Osteopathy was introduced in America before Chiropractic, there have been stories that the inventor of Chiropractic stole his theory. Now there is still some questions about the differences.

Osteopathy is also classed as an ‘alternative medicine’ and 4 years of education is needed before practising. Osteopathy treatment aims at preventing mechanical disorders by moving, stretching, and massaging a patient’s muscles and joints. A person’s wellbeing depends on the health of the individual’s bones, muscles, ligaments and connective tissue functioning smoothly together.

Types of treatment:

Dry needling, soft tissue and articulation techniques.

Common conditions that are treated:

Arthritis, digestive problems, tennis elbow, neck and back pain.

Osteopathy is offered at our studio in Bedford Place, Southampton.

Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy aims at treating disease, injury, or deformity by using massage, exercise, and heat treatment without using drugs or surgery. There is a large emphasis on movement and increasing mobility in the joints to prevent further injury.

It’s most commonly practised within the NHS but also in private care. Minimal training required is 3 years, but some may extend their education further within a specific field. It’s a science-based therapy which treats neurological, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, and respiratory conditions.

Types of treatment: Movement and exercise, manual therapy, education and advice.

Common conditions that are treated: Sport injuries, stroke, Parkinson’s, chronic heart disease, and asthma.

We welcome Philip to the team of YOU Massage Therapy offering Physiotherapy, appointments available for Physiotherapy in Southampton NOW. Book online or call 02380 639747

Massage therapy

Massage therapy aims at enhancing a person’s wellbeing with manual manipulation of soft tissues of the body, including muscles, tendons, ligaments, and connective tissue. There are several different types of massage treatments available, but the two main groups are:

Rehabilitative massage: Sports massage, Deep tissue, medical, therapeutic or clinical massage.

Relaxation massage: Swedish massage, holistic massage, and reflexology.

The main purpose of massage is to relieve stress and tension from the body and mind. There are a lot of choices of massage, it’s important to find the type that suites you. Trigger points and soft tissue techniques are used to relieve pain and stress within the muscles.

Types of treatment:

Lymphatic drainage, Reiki, Myo-fascial, aromatherapy, and Thai massage.

Common conditions treated:

Headaches, frozen shoulder, strains and sprains, muscular pain, and tendinitis.

Southampton’s newest Physiotherapist – Phil

Southampton Physiotherapy

YOU Massage are exceptionally excited to be now offering expert Physiotherapy to the

Running-Physio-Southampton

Philip is a life-long running enthusiast, with a specialist interest in Physio for athletes

people of Southampton from our Bedford

Meet Philip, and receive a complementary Southampton Physio consultation * this September 2018.

Book online or call 02380 639747

As written by Philip Coleman BSc (Hons) MCSP for YOU Massage Therapy

Chartered Physiotherapist

Philip is a chartered and HCPC registered physiotherapist.

After gaining a BSc (Hons) degree in physiotherapy in 2008 from UWE, Bristol he worked as a rotational physiotherapist in the NHS, covering musculoskeletal outpatients, orthopaedics and elderly rehabilitation.

Since graduation he has been on various post graduate training and courses.

On promotion to senior physiotherapist he worked at the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford as a clinical specialist in the musculoskeletal triage service, where he assessed patients to identify their optimal clinical pathway. He also helped run classes for patients with chronic back pain.  More recently he has specialised in musculoskeletal conditions in private practice and has also had experience in community physiotherapy in the NHS where he helped patients with complex medical conditions.  Philip is qualified in the Otago exercise programme for the prevention of falls, a major cause of disability in an ageing population….

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